REVIEWS

Diluvion

Diluvion
Jules Verne was here

Diluvion: What tenacious creatures these people are! As soon as the universe did not try to destroy them: it sent deadly diseases, used the services of aggressive alien civilizations, turned scientific progress against them, even pitted them against each other, forcing them to appreciate all the charms of nuclear winter – they didn’t care! By some miracle, these bipeds always survived and organized this post-apocalypse of theirs, maliciously mocking the very concept of “end of the world”. Well, who else, one wonders, is more tenacious: a man or a cockroach?

This time, the Arachnid Games studio tried to end humanity by setting up a global flood and justifying their act by saying that the human race was snickering: all the benefits are in abundance, but some especially arrogant Homo sapiens want too much. As usual, the authors did not succeed: people did not want to die out and, setting up submarines, set off to explore a brave new world at the bottom of the seas and oceans.

This is approximately the plot of Diluvion – adjusted for the fact that, of course, it was not the developers who decided to punish humanity, but the nameless gods, leaving, just in case, somewhere under the water column a certain powerful artifact that gives the one who found it something not completely clear, but obviously very cool, up to saving the whole world. The player is informed about this in a few sentences at the very beginning, for decency, providing the text with almost motionless illustrations. At this point, the plot ends and does not make itself felt until the final credits. Because your main task is to survive, gawking at local attractions along the way. By the way, this is how you can describe the whole local gameplay.

After a trivial introduction, you are prompted to make a standard choice of three ships: fast, but “thin” and low-capacity; strong, but slow and clumsy; and the classic medium balanced version. Then the only initial member of the crew (you will get the rest in the course of the story) – the helmsman – briefly describes the situation: the ship is not suitable for diving more than 200 meters; the best nishtyaki can only be found at a depth of about 1 kilometer; and to hire assistants, you need to get to the nearest underwater bar. This is how our aimless journey begins, and all further advice and instructions also boil down to “Find this, find that”, “Do another upgrade” or “Hire this drunk sailor at the bar.” Oh yeah, and “Don’t Forget About That Divine Artifact,” of course.

At first, it seems that such a meager motivation will be compensated by the local lore, but no matter how: the game is full of characters, but there is not a single bright one – even the key NPCs, apart from their important mission of plot guides, do almost nothing different from the minor dummy. All dialogues in Diluvion are monosyllabic, uninformative and serve only as an excuse for another stupid task to find 10 metal plates. This is partly offset by the most beautiful surroundings and truly interesting locations: an icy city hanging like stalactites from a frozen water surface; a huge arachnid monster killed by a direct collision with a bathyscaphe; a minefield with mines of indecently huge size. There are plenty of other interesting places too. next to each of which in a small capsule is a brief description of the attraction. Exploration is the best part of the game, even though there is frankly little incentive for it here (mostly it is the search for resources), and the map of the area is exactly what a real map is: only new important objects like settlements are marked on it, but not yourself.

You need to navigate by the compass, which adds to the game not only hardcore but also the atmosphere: you feel like a true captain. In addition, an excellent unobtrusive soundtrack helps to brighten up the journey through the deep expanses, accurately conveying the mood of each individual moment in a certain context, whether it be a tense battle or a calm underwater walk. that there are frankly few incentives for him here (mostly a search for resources), and a map of the area is exactly what a real map is: only new important objects like settlements are marked on it, but not you yourself. You need to navigate by the compass, which adds to the game not only hardcore but also the atmosphere: you feel like a true captain.

In addition, an excellent unobtrusive soundtrack helps to brighten up the journey through the deep expanses, accurately conveying the mood of each individual moment in a certain context, whether it be a tense battle or a calm underwater walk. that there are frankly few incentives for him here (mostly a search for resources), and a map of the area is exactly what a real map is: only new important objects like settlements are marked on it, but not you yourself. You need to navigate by the compass, which adds to the game not only hardcore but also the atmosphere: you feel like a true captain. In addition, an excellent unobtrusive soundtrack helps to brighten up the journey through the deep expanses, accurately conveying the mood of each individual moment in a certain context, whether it be a tense battle or a calm underwater walk.

It overshadows, alas, everything else. Diluvion pretends to be hardcore, but forgets that the player still needs to be entertained. For a simulator, it is too arcade, and for an arcade it has unforgivably little variety. Even if you close your eyes to not the most convenient controls and the crooked camera (which now and then swims away into the textures and fixes in such a way that you have to shoot at opponents almost blindly), there is not much to do in the game world: except to collect monotonous loot for the sake of ship upgrades and fight with pirates. And you don’t have to expect exciting action from the battles – you just circle around the enemy ship, trying to hit it more times than it hit you. 

At first, when you don’t know that all the fights in the game follow the same scenario, it’s even interesting: each opponent poses a tangible threat, therefore, maneuvering and exchanging missiles build up a lot of tension, and when you emerge from the battle as a winner, you feel joyful relief. But quite quickly, simple firefights turn into a routine, and rare save points only exacerbate the situation: after swimming a significant distance to the target, you risk getting a sudden torpedo in the side, as a result of which you will have to go all the way from the checkpoint all over again. A funny detail: in the holds of a wrecked enemy ship, you can sometimes meet a surviving crew member who is not averse to joining your team, but – attention! – only for money. 

The absurdity at this moment just rolls over, and I want to shout: “Well, drown yourself, you mercantile moron!” But quite quickly, simple firefights turn into a routine, and rare save points only exacerbate the situation: after swimming a significant distance to the target, you risk getting a sudden torpedo in the side, as a result of which you will have to go all the way from the checkpoint all over again. A funny detail: in the holds of a wrecked enemy ship, you can sometimes meet a surviving crew member who is not averse to joining your team, but – attention! – only for money. The absurdity at this moment just rolls over, and I want to shout:

“Well, drown yourself, you mercantile moron!” But quite quickly, simple firefights turn into a routine, and rarely save points only exacerbate the situation: after swimming a significant distance to the target, you risk getting a sudden torpedo in the side, as a result of which you will have to go all the way from the checkpoint all over again. A funny detail: in the holds of a wrecked enemy ship, you can sometimes meet a surviving crew member who is not averse to joining your team, but – attention! – only for money.

The absurdity at this moment just rolls over, and I want to shout: “Well, drown yourself, you mercantile moron!” in the holds of a wrecked enemy ship, you can sometimes meet a surviving crew member who is not averse to joining your team, but – attention! – only for money. The absurdity at this moment just rolls over, and I want to shout: “Well, drown yourself, you mercantile moron!” in the holds of a wrecked enemy ship, you can sometimes meet a surviving crew member who is not averse to joining your team, but – attention! – only for money. The absurdity at this moment just rolls over, and I want to shout: “Well, drown yourself, you mercantile moron!”

Diluvion skillfully lures into its waters, like an angler fish, deftly pretending to be almost an analogue of Sunless Sea with a different perspective. But as soon as the player pecks at the bright bait in the form of an unusual setting and a beautiful world, it immediately devours his expectations with gameplay despondency and meager content. It seems that the developers hurried with the release of their project and for some reason ignored the “Early Access” – in the current state of the game, that’s where it belongs.

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